• Indie News

    Toronto: Imogen Poots' 'Castle in the Ground,' Ellen Page Racism Documentary Join Lineup

    Toronto: Imogen Poots' 'Castle in the Ground,' Ellen Page Racism Documentary Join Lineup
    The Toronto Film Festival on Wednesday unveiled its Canadian film lineup, including world premieres for films by Ellen Page, Joey Kline, Amy Jo Johnson and Jeff Barnaby.

    The festival gave a TIFF Docs slot to There's Something in the Water, Page and Gaycation co-host Ian Daniel's documentary about environmental racism toward indigenous and African Canadian communities in The Umbrella Academy star's native Nova Scotia; and a Contemporary World Cinema berth to Joey Klein's Castle in the Ground, an opioid addiction drama that stars Imogen Poots, Alex Wolff, Neve Campbell, Tom Cullen and Keir Gilchrist.

    Toronto booked a special presentations slot ...
    See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

    ‘Them That Follow’ Examines the Poison of Fanatacism and Poverty in Appalachia

    ‘Them That Follow’ Examines the Poison of Fanatacism and Poverty in Appalachia
    Fresh from her Oscar win for The Favourite, the indisputably great Olivia Colman shows up in Them That Follow as a snake-handling Pentecostal congregationalist in the Appalachian mountains who finds her faith sorely tested. You might want to read that sentence twice since this movie does not follow any traditional paths. But the faith it examines, in practice for more than 100 years, is considered a religious freedom by those even in areas that seek to outlaw it. Writer-directors Britt Poulton and Dan Madison Savage do not come from a Pentecostal church background,
    See full article at Rolling Stone »

    ‘Archer’ Is Finally Moving Forward, But Not After Starting Over One More Time

    ‘Archer’ Is Finally Moving Forward, But Not After Starting Over One More Time
    [Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “Archer” Season 10, “Robert De Niro,” including the ending.]

    It was time to move forward. Over the last three seasons of “Archer,” creator Adam Reed sent his merry band of marauders to “Dreamland,” “Danger Island,” and “1999,” resetting their surroundings and professions each year without altering their enticing character dynamics. The results made for grand entertainment — and proved how far the series’ core could be stretched without cracking — but the set-up demanded a return to the present, sooner rather than later.

    Thus, the Season 10 finale abides, wrapping up a series of silly, lush, and barely connected space adventures with a big bang that doubled as a jumpstart back to reality. As unveiled at Comic-Con, “Archer” finally wakes up. The coma he was sent into at the end of Season 7 comes to a close, as do the dreamy adventures he went on while unconscious that shaped each previous season.

    And yet, what Reed has accomplished
    See full article at Indiewire »

    WGA Challenger Craig Mazin Drops Out of Race, Citing Family Medical Issue

    WGA Challenger Craig Mazin Drops Out of Race, Citing Family Medical Issue
    Chernobyl” writer-creator Craig Mazin, vocal in his opposition to the Writers Guild of America‘s current strategy in its battle with talent agencies, announced Wednesday that’s he’s dropping out of the running for the union’s second-in-command due to a family medical issue.

    Mazin was running for vice president as part of a slate of WGA West executive candidates led by “Carol” scribe and presidential hopeful Phyllis Nagy. The group takes issue with the WGA’s current position in the agency fight: Mazin contends that union leadership ought to be open to negotiating a compromise, rather than see the entire practice of packaging as a non-starter.

    “I am regrettably withdrawing from the race for vice president of the Wgaw due to a medical issue with an immediate family member that will require more of my attention and care in the next year than I had expected,” Mazin said
    See full article at Indiewire »

    A24 Shares Viral Video of Child Fleeing Movie Theater During ‘Midsommar’ Screening

    A24 Shares Viral Video of Child Fleeing Movie Theater During ‘Midsommar’ Screening
    [Editor’s note: The following post contains spoilers for “Midsommar.”]

    Bringing a young child to an Ari Aster movie probably isn’t the best idea. A24 is going viral after sharing a video of a young boy quickly running with his father out of a movie theater in the middle of a “Midsommar” screening. Aster’s latest was rated R by the MPAA for “disturbing ritualistic violence, grisly images, strong sexual content, graphic nudity, drug use and language,” so it’s not exactly a children’s movie.

    Midsommar” featured no shortage of horrific imagery, especially for kids. The story centers around a grieving young woman (Florence Pugh) who vacations to a remote Swedish village with her boyfriend (Jack Reynor) and discovers the townspeople are members of a pagan cult. In one sequence, Pugh and Reynor’s character bear witness to a cult ceremony in which two elderly citizens plunge off a cliff to their deaths. Aster shows the suicides in graphic detail.
    See full article at Indiewire »

    The Emmy Race for Limited Series Promises to Be Just As Dramatic As Its Nominees

    The outstanding quality of this year’s Outstanding Limited Series nominees can’t be overstated.

    It’s a race that appeared largely cut and dry last December, when Showtime’s “Escape at Dannemora” repeatedly edged out HBO’s “Sharp Objects” to take home trophies at the Golden Globes, Screen Actors Guild Awards, and Directors Guild Awards.

    Yet as the 2019 Emmy Awards grow ever closer, “Dannemora” is far from a front-runner, facing stiff competition from a duo of series debuting late in the eligibility period in HBO’s “Chernobyl” and Netflix’s “When They See Us.” With “Sharp Objects” still hanging around and FX’s niche gem “Fosse/Verdon” holding its own, limited series provides rich dividends for awards analysis.

    This week IndieWire Editor-at-Large Anne Thompson and TV Awards Editor Libby Hill are doing just that, sizing up the contenders in Limited Series, as well as its writing and directing categories, in
    See full article at Indiewire »

    Venice Juror Jennifer Kent Disappointed Only Two Women Directors Competing at 2019 Festival

    Venice Juror Jennifer Kent Disappointed Only Two Women Directors Competing at 2019 Festival
    When Jennifer Kent’s “The Nightingale” debuted at the Venice Film Festival last year, it was the only film in competition from a woman director. Upon her return to the lauded Italian festival as a jury member, the filmmaker was dismayed to find that the numbers haven’t improved. The 2019 festival will host just two films from women directors, a whopping one more than last year. Haifaa Al-Mansour’s “The Candidate” and Shannon Murphy’s “Babyteeth” will vie for the Golden Lion at this year’s festival. Speaking to The Wrap recently, Kent, whose previous film “The Babadook” became one of the defining horror films of the century to date, made no secret of her disappointment with the dismal numbers.

    “I think it’s an issue. I hoped there would be more. I really did,” Kent said. “There are some incredible women out there making films, and we need to see them,
    See full article at Indiewire »

    How Hans Zimmer Recreated ‘The Lion King’ Score With a Greater ‘Circle of Life’ Musical Vibe

    How Hans Zimmer Recreated ‘The Lion King’ Score With a Greater ‘Circle of Life’ Musical Vibe
    For Hans Zimmer, “The Lion King” has always been “about giving to Africa,” not “taking from Africa.” And 25 years later, returning to his Oscar-winning score, he had a greater sense of purpose. The world had changed, and so had Zimmer, who leaned into the primacy of nature and environmental themes in Jon Favreau’s innovative remake comprised of stunning, life-like, CG animation. “The Circle of Life” had now come to life in all its beautiful African glory, like a narrative nature doc, and Zimmer tuned in musically with that vibe.

    “Jon is a smart man,” Zimmer said. “He knew I had some sense of ownership, but at the same time, what is there to talk about? I thought I knew what they were doing. He showed me the opening and it was way beyond my imagination. It looks like reality, but there’s great artistry involved…very emotional.”

    And it
    See full article at Indiewire »

    Paul Thomas Anderson Re-Teams With Haim for a Music Video Visit to Tarantino’s Own Movie Theater

    Paul Thomas Anderson Re-Teams With Haim for a Music Video Visit to Tarantino’s Own Movie Theater
    The sisterly trio Haim are back after a nearly two-year hiatus from making new music, and they’ve got a brand-new music video shot by their frequent filmmaking collaborator Paul Thomas Anderson to prove it. Following past videos for their songs “Right Now,” “Little of Your Love,” and “Night So Long,” the foursome are back together for another winsome look at life in Los Angeles in the form of a fresh video for “Summer Girl.”

    This one even includes a cinephilic crossover for the ages: as the trio stroll around Los Angeles and literally shed the seasons, they spend some time at a number of La landmarks, including the Quentin Tarantino-owned New Beverly Cinema on Beverly Boulevard.

    Despite the zippy and warm nature of the song, it apparently was inspired by serious personal upheaval. As Pitchfork reports, in a press release, Danielle Haim wrote of its genesis: “I started
    See full article at Indiewire »

    ‘Before You Know It’ Trailer: Judith Light Revisits Her Soap Opera Days in Family Comedy

    ‘Before You Know It’ Trailer: Judith Light Revisits Her Soap Opera Days in Family Comedy
    Diehard fans of the actress Judith Light — and there are many — will no doubt remember her trailblazing turn as Karen Wolek on “One Life to Live,” a role she played from 1977-1983. Originally presented as a two-dimensional gold-digging vixen, Light’s performance turned the character into a fan favorite. In a pivotal 1979 episode, the character reveals on the witness stand her secret life as a sex worker, an early sympathetic depiction of the profession that was largely free from negative stereotypes. Whether or not audiences remember the historic moment, Light’s turn as a fading soap opera star in Jen Tullock and Hannah Pearl Utt’s family comedy, “Before You Know It,” is sure to delight fans young and old.

    The movie premiered at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival to largely warm reviews, and the newly released trailer offers a glimpse of the creative duo’s quirky wit.

    Per the official
    See full article at Indiewire »

    Damon Herriman Says He Rarely Spoke With Tarantino About His ‘Mindhunter’ Charles Manson

    Damon Herriman Says He Rarely Spoke With Tarantino About His ‘Mindhunter’ Charles Manson
    Following summer 2019, Australian actor Damon Herriman is always going to be known as Charles Manson. The “Justified” veteran appears as the infamous serial killer in two major works: Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” and the second season of Netflix’s David Fincher-produced serial killer drama “Mindhunter.” What was it like playing the same character for two cinematic masters? It’s one of several questions Herriman answers during an interview on Film Comment’s “Back to One” podcast.

    Herriman shot his Manson scenes for Tarantino’s “Hollywood” after wrapping production on “Mindhunter.” Both projects feature the serial killer in a limited supporting role but differ greatly because of the time period settings. “Hollywood” takes place in 1969 and features Manson at his prime, while “Mindhunter” Season 2 covers the Atlanta Child Murders in the early 1980s and features an older, imprisoned Manson. Herriman alluded to the fact the
    See full article at Indiewire »

    August TV Premieres: 12 New Shows to Look Out For This Month

    August TV Premieres: 12 New Shows to Look Out For This Month
    From true crime documentaries to nature specials to multi-level marketing schemes, there is plenty to keep you cool in August.

    More from IndieWire'Lord of the Rings': Orlando Bloom Thinks He's Too Old to Play Legolas on Amazon Series'David Makes Man' Trailer: Tarell Alvin McCraney Brings 'Penetrative Poem' to Own -- Exclusive'Carnival Row' First Look: Orlando Bloom and Cara Delevingne in Amazon's Victorian Fantasy -- Watch
    See full article at Indiewire »

    Paul Thomas Anderson Returns With Yet Another Music Video For The Band Haim

    Paul Thomas Anderson is the rare director that started with films and went on to begin directing music videos. Even rarer still, Anderson hasn’t forgotten the short-form music video medium over the course of his career, regularly popping up and directing new clips for bands. His latest foray into short-form music videos has been with the band Haim, for which he’s directed no less than four clips for.

    Well, make that five.

    Continue reading Paul Thomas Anderson Returns With Yet Another Music Video For The Band Haim at The Playlist.
    See full article at The Playlist »

    Bria Vinaite on Life After ‘The Florida Project’: ‘I Didn’t Know What to Do With Myself’

    Bria Vinaite on Life After ‘The Florida Project’: ‘I Didn’t Know What to Do With Myself’
    Before Bria Vinaite landed her breakout role in Sean Baker’s Oscar-nominated 2017 film “The Florida Project,” she was selling marijuana-themed outerwear on Instagram. Raised in Brooklyn and born in Lithuania, she had the specific kind of no-nonsense vibe Baker was seeking for the role of Halley, a single mother and sex worker living with her daughter in a rundown Florida motel next to Disney World. Along with Brooklynn Prince, another Baker discovery who played Halley’s daughter, Moonee, Vinaite earned unadulterated praise for her raw and charismatic performance. Once the film entered the awards race and picked up a slew of accolades, Vinaite’s life changed drastically, launching a burgeoning acting career for which she had very little preparation.

    “I got home after four months on the press tour and I was so depressed,” the 26-year-old recently told The Independent. “I was like, ‘Oh, I don’t have a hundred people taking my picture anymore?
    See full article at Indiewire »

    ‘Tel Aviv on Fire’ Review: A Winning Soap Opera Farce About the Insanity of War

    ‘Tel Aviv on Fire’ Review: A Winning Soap Opera Farce About the Insanity of War
    A winsome and delicate farce about a (fictional) Palestinian soap opera that people are able to enjoy on both sides of the West Bank, Sameh Zoabi’s “Tel Aviv on Fire” might be the film we need right now if it didn’t have so much fun taking the piss out of the notion that there could ever be a “film that we need right now;” that a movie, or a daytime television show, could ever help broker a peace that the real world isn’t ready to support.

    But this clever little comedy isn’t quite as cynical as that makes it sound. Dancing around political dynamite for 95 dryly amusing minutes, Zoabi’s self-reflexive third feature asks if it’s even possible to tell a credible story about an ongoing conflict without picking sides, or if the only viable options are propaganda and na?veté. And in order to do that,
    See full article at Indiewire »

    Olivia Wilde To Direct Upcoming Thriller ‘Don’t Worry, Darling’ & Reteam With Her ‘Booksmart’ Writer

    Apparently, director Olivia Wilde and writer Katie Silberman have developed quite the working relationship. After their first collaboration, “Booksmart,” received critical acclaim and is regarded as one of the best of 2019 so far, the duo signed to direct and write, respectively, a new comedy film for Universal. However, Wilde and Silberman are back at it and have decided to bring their talents to the realm of thrillers.

    Continue reading Olivia Wilde To Direct Upcoming Thriller ‘Don’t Worry, Darling’ & Reteam With Her ‘Booksmart’ Writer at The Playlist.
    See full article at The Playlist »

    ‘Too Old To Die Young’: Nicolas Winding Refn On His “Heroin-Induced, Obsessive, Fetish Ride About America” [Interview]

    The karma of our great nation has come full circle. Concentration camps have been reborn, immigration as has been weaponized by the side of hate, and Hollywood is about to knock one of its most beloved record stores down. Yet sure as a phoenix rising from the ashes, Nicolas Winding Refn remains a singular filmmaker who firmly believes in the power of rebirth and resurrection; a storytelling seer who feels “creativity is truly the only thing that makes the world move forward.”

    Read More: ‘Too Old To Die Young’: Nicolas Winding Refn Crafts An Audacious, Hypnodrone Porno Nightmare of Post-Trump Polarity [Full Series Review]

    Even with America run by a racist pumpkin-head dotard, the Danish director still sees hope on the horizon.

    Continue reading ‘Too Old To Die Young’: Nicolas Winding Refn On His “Heroin-Induced, Obsessive, Fetish Ride About America” [Interview] at The Playlist.
    See full article at The Playlist »

    Samantha Morton Is “Forever Grateful” To Have Worked With Woody Allen & Doesn’t Have Any Regrets

    British actress Samantha Morton has had a pretty great career in the realm of film and TV. In fact, she’s actually been nominated for two Oscars, with her first one coming in 2000 thanks to her role in Woody Allen’s “Sweet and Lowdown.” And it’s that film that Morton credits for kickstarting her career and is why she has very specific thoughts on the controversial filmmaker.

    Speaking to Vanity Fair, Morton discussed her feelings about working with Woody Allen.

    Continue reading Samantha Morton Is “Forever Grateful” To Have Worked With Woody Allen & Doesn’t Have Any Regrets at The Playlist.
    See full article at The Playlist »

    Jesse Eisenberg Knows His Characters Are Arrogant, But They’re Never the Joke

    Jesse Eisenberg Knows His Characters Are Arrogant, But They’re Never the Joke
    Jesse Eisenberg excels at playing jittery, insecure young men, but he’ll never pursue those roles as a punchline. “People describe me as playing characters that are shy or introverted,” he said during a recent lunch in Chelsea. “These are things that are also natural to me as a person. I grew up introverted and shy in a smart family, and so when I read scripts that commodify and mock that…” He trailed off and grinned. “Is ‘kryptonite’ the right word?”

    It was an ironic choice for the guy who played Lex Luthor in “Batman v. Superman,” a role that Eisenberg said he tackled for the villain’s longstanding pop-culture pedigree. It was better than some of the other paycheck gigs sent his way. “There was a movie that I heard was being developed at a major studio, which was about a guy who comes up with a math equation to make the perfect girlfriend,
    See full article at Indiewire »

    ‘Sherman’s Showcase’ Review: IFC’s Unbound Fanboy Costume Party Is a Blast

    In the tradition and style of IFC’s sublime “Documentary Now!” parody series, the bizarre allure of “Sherman’s Showcase” is that it’s a spoof that takes itself seriously. The IFC series from Diallo Riddle and Bashir Salahuddin is sneering in tone, wringing out the absurdities to be found in classic shows like “Soul Train” and “Solid Gold,” even as it goes to great lengths to imitate their style. Satirizing a format the creators clearly love, the series is so obviously a passion project – a fanboy costume party that celebrates a legendary, even if fictional, TV program’s history.

    A variety show in the purest sense of the word, “Sherman’s Showcase” is structured as a series of infomercials – running from a few seconds to several minutes in length – for a 23-disc DVD compilation of a 40-year-old music variety show, hosted by Salahuddin’s egotistical and maybe even slightly shady Sherman McDaniel.
    See full article at Indiewire »
    An error has occured. Please try again.

    Recently Viewed